Supercapacitors Use Carbon Nanotube Tech & Simple Materials

 - Dec 10, 2009
References: news.stanford.edu & treehugger
Batteries and supercapacitors made from paper and a special carbon nanotube ink may be able to provide cheap and easy power storage solutions, according to Stanford researchers. Paper and ink batteries are created by heating the paired materials. The nano-ink sticks to the fibrous paper to create an extremely durable supercapacitor that may be able to last through 40,000 charge-discharge cycles—far more than a lithium battery.

Previous research has been done using plastics, but paper provides a better foundation because the nano-ink makes a stronger bond with paper. Even when crumbled, the paper batteries continue to work.