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Shadowy Art from Macabre Mummified Critters

By: Katie Cordrey - Published: • References: gagosian & britishmuseum.org
Tim Noble and Sue Webster created, ‘Dark Stuff,’ a work that was included in the exhibition Statuephilia ‘Contemporary Sculptors at The British Museum,’ London in 2008—09. The couple is known for their use of recycled garbage to create sculptural mounds that in turn create shadow art when light is projected across them. 'Dark Stuff' uses the same technique, but the recycled items are the mummified remains of small animals.

The tiny creatures met their end at the paws of the couple’s feral farmyard cat. When assembled, they cast a shadow of the artists’ profiles onto the walls of the ancient Egyptian galleries. Given the importance of mummies in ancient Egyptian culture, this art seems quite appropriate to both the theme and spirit of the display. The innovative--although macabre--recycling aspect is worthy of consideration on environmental merit. Stats for Recycled Animal Corpses Trending: Older & Warm
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