Superstar

Earth Hour 2008

By: Bianca Bartz - Published: • References: wwf & thestar
Hundreds of countries around the world will be participating in Earth Hour this Saturday, but Canada is one of the most keen with 1 in 606 signed on to participate (the US only has 1 in 5,347 committed.)

"Last week, Canada was in first place, but now trails the U.S. about 2,000 with close to 55,000 people who have officially committed, via earthhour.org, to turning off their lights from 8 to 9 p.m. Saturday," The Star reported.

In addition to shutting out their lights for 60 minutes on March 29, many people are willing to do even more to support the WWF event. Bigger corporations are joining in too; McDonalds has even promised to shut off the lights on the famous golden arches!

Canadian singer Nelly Furtado will be hosting a free concert in support of the event in Toronto. After she sings her hit song "Turn Off the Light," landmark buildings like the CN Tower and City Hall will completely powered down.

Another free concert will be held in Prince Rupert, B.C. In Woodbridge, Ontario, they're organizing lantern walks.

Across the country, hundreds of restaurants have signed on to serve candlelit dinners. Cafe Koi in Calgary, a city that's also agreed to shut off the lights of municipal buildings, has agreed to shut their lights off for the entire night, not just for the designated Earth Hour.

"Many buildings and landmarks will turn off their lights," WWF notes. "These include the CN Tower, Niagara Falls, Toronto Eaton Centre, Fairmont Royal York Hotel, Honest Ed's in Ontario; all buildings in which VanCity, BC Hydro and City of Vancouver operate; and the MacDonald Bridge, City Hall, and Parade Square in Halifax.'

And look at what a Toronto hotel is doing... Stats for Canada's Green Commitment Trending: Older & Mild
Traction: 2,537 clicks in 337 w
Interest: > 3 minutes
Concept: Canada's Green Commitment
Related: 65 examples / 50 photos
Segment: Neutral, 18-35
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