Prodigy

Jalila Essaidi Evolves Bioart Through Slow-Motion Captures

By: Paul Maccarone - Published: • References: jalilaessaidi & dazeddigital
"Bioart" continues to gain traction in the art community, and just like science, it continues to evolve. Using skin tissues to stop bullets is just one of the new experiments that Jalila Essaidi captures through the use of slow-motion video.

The ever-reappearing question of what constitutes art is once again brought up in regards to whether bioart should be classified under the already broad term. The art community is starting to warm up to the new field though; scientists and artists are beginning to collaborate on new pieces that further push the envelope. The human body and the evolution of our species will always remain one of the most complex forms of art. I can't think of a better way to create new waves of expressionism than to use biological substances that when combined form a large majority of the existing art world. Stats for Biologically Grown Masterpieces Trending: Older & Average
Traction: 539 clicks in 62 w
Interest: > 3 minutes
Concept: Bioart
Related: 77 examples / 59 photos
Segment: Neutral, 18-55
Comparison Set: 28 similar articles, including: online science portfolio platforms, vibrant pathogen self-portraits, and geometric sci-fi collections.