Dayna Danger's Native BDSM Mask Questions Complacent Views on Sensuality

 - Feb 13, 2018
References: pdaprojects & cbc
Artist Dayna Danger's new display of native BDSM masks is changing the way Indigenous intimacy is seen. The 2Spirit Metis visual artist, is using these masks as an exploration between the dynamics of sexuality, gender and power in a consensual feminist manner. These masks feature prominent leather work along with intricate beading, and mark the first time the artist had ever used beading as a technique. This technique was inspired by Danger's mother, and each mask took over 100 hours to make. The concept behind the masks was to expose indigenous intimacy and give it strength, much in the same way a vigilante draws power from their mask.

The native BDSM masks are currently on display at the Winnipeg Art Gallery and have received equal amounts of acclaim and criticism. Some have questioned the masks and their representation of Indigenous women, while others have praised the pieces as a celebration of the often repressed identity. Danger has welcomed much of the criticism on these pieces and has stated that these critics push them to create artwork that attacks complacency and embrace discomfort.

Image Credit: CBC, Dayna Danger, Winnipeg Art Gallery (WAG)