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Sexy DIY Advertising Reveals The Truth Behind Chocolate

By: Chris Clarke - Published: • References: adhack & commercial-archive
I'm tired of traditional advertising that insults my intelligence. Too often, ads are one-way messages from brands telling consumers what to purchase through overt campaigns that depend on boring stereotypes to inspire us to buy.

Most consumers listen to (and trust) product opinions from friends and family far more than any traditional ad developed by professionals. Savvy marketers are realizing the potential of a new (un)advertising model that highlights peer-to-peer recommendations and personal perceptions over rosy fantasies.

Communities are developing around consumer generated advertising, or do-it-yourself (DIY) "ad hacking" that look very promising as a way to share a brand story, without the message coming from the brand itself. Designers, photographers and other creative folks are pushing the advertising envelope online by featuring their own opinions, testimonials and reviews in fresh formats that threaten to blow the socks off the traditional advertising paradigm.

These are ads created by real people, featuring brand perceptions from real people, about products and services they actually use. These are the ads that resonate the loudest with consumers, and there are some powerful, creative examples of ad hacks from real consumers that highlight unique brand perceptions -- shared by many.

According to Vancouver-based Adhack.com, 6 out of 10 women prefer chocolates to sex. Can this be true?

I think you'll understand when you view this sexy consumer generated ad that transports a viewer right out of their comfort zone, and sheds a new light on an otherwise ubiquitous Valentine's gift: Stats for Sexy DIY Advertising Reveals the Truth Behind Chocolate Trending: Older & Buzzing
Traction: 6,677 clicks in 357 w
Interest: 4 minutes
Concept: Sexy DIY Advertising Reveals The Truth Behind Chocolate
Related: 64 examples / 49 photos
Segment: Males, 18-35
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