The Isochrone Table's Divot is Formed Over an Entire Week

By: Joey Haar - Oct 5, 2016
References: mischertraxler & dezeen
Austrian design studio Mischer'Traxler's Isochrone table is built through a time intensive process, although it isn't a labor intensive one. The tabletop, which comprises several colored strata, get its concave crater by being grated with a swinging pendulum constantly over the course of an entire week.

The Isochrone table was created as part of the Schloss Hollenegg Design residency, which takes place in an 850 year old castle of the same name outside of Graz, Austria. This year's theme for the residency was "slow," which prompted the designers at Mischer-Traxler to invent their persistent process. Each Isochrone tabletop has seven differently colored layers, representing the seven families who have inhabited the castle.

Mischer'Traxler used medium density fiberboard to create each stratum of the tabletop. This material consists of pressed together sawdust, paper pulp, glue, and pigments.